Author Archives: Admin2014


This article is a response to my month-long residency at Colonial Williamsburg published on their official blog, MakingHistoryNow.org My residency in Williamsburg will remain a shining time in my life and in my family’s. I remain forever indebted to Colonial Williamsburg Foundation for its generous recognition of my work. Look for “Miralles & Rendon” a new play I’m writing describing the strange sojourn of Spain’s first, de facto ambassadors to the recently named country: “The United States of America.”

Reflections of a Revolutionary in Residence

“Papi, am I a princess?” “Yes, Anabella, you are. But we all are. In our country every one of us is a king or a princess,” I said, echoing...

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“In Buddhism, the term anattā (Pali) or anātman (Sanskrit) refers to the doctrine of “non-self”, that there is no unchanging, permanent self, soul or essence in living beings.” -“Anatta,” Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatta

Knowing at Fifty

Everything stems from a certitude that time is running out
…You use hourglass metaphors without a hint of irony

Cleaning electric razors upset you because there’s only white stubble
…You actually choose one side of the bed over the other

Sex is a rarely-visited, exotic destination
…you buy a selection of colognes as consolation.

Women won’t look back at you when you walk past
…so dogs become a sudden and unanticipated blessing

Your attention...

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Five Rarely Seen Photos of Normandy 1944

Today is 6th June: the anniversary of D-Day, when Allied forces landed on the Normandy coastline. D-Day and Normandy has prompted thousands of books, and during the campaign many thousands of photos were taken on both sides of the battlefield. These are a small selection of rarely seen images.

I wanted to post this today, the 73 anniversary of D-Day, Northern France, follow the link to read more.

The pictures above are from a website authored by Mr. Paul Reed, an historian who divides his time between France and England. He can be seen on @BBC & @Channel4 with specialism in WW1 & WW2.  Author with @penswordbooks. Battlefield guide @LegerHolidays....

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JUAN MIRALLES TRAYLLÓN, EL ESPAÑOL QUE MURIÓ EN LA CASA DE GEORGE WASHINGTON

por Luis Manuel Moll Juan

“En plena guerra de la independencia, este español, ayudó a George Washington a obtener la victoria sobre las fuerzas inglesas.”

Juan de Miralles Trayllón, nació en la localidad alicantina de Petrer el 23 de julio de 1713, hijo de un capitán de infantería, que defendió la causa del rey Felipe V durante la guerra de la Secesión Española.

Su padre, que compartía su procedencia bearnesa con la mayoría de los franceses radicados en el levante español en aquella época, se había mudado a Alicante como oficial de las tropas felipistas para liderar los combates contra los partidarios del...

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The Buddhist Path – Footprint of the Buddha

A look at how Buddhism is practiced in Sri Lanka and India. Ronald Eyre meets [the late] Venerable Ananda Maitreya a Buddhist monk from Sri Lanka. Categories: Ananda Maitreya, Theravada, Video Tags: Buddhist film

I never mention my practice as I guard it very closely in my life. It’s too personal. I’ve been a Buddhist for over 4 years now, after having taken my vows. Please enjoy this primer to the Mahayana School of Buddhism–it’s an oldie but a goodie…

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Building a 400-Year-Old Collection of Weapons

At the Governor’s Palace alone, 230 muskets-including 80 original pieces-are on display along with 18 reproduction pistols and nearly 300 reproduction swords. But that’s just a drop in the bucket when it comes to the arms and militaria collection of Colonial Williamsburg.

At the Governor’s Palace alone, 230 muskets—including 80 original pieces—are on display along with 18 reproduction pistols and nearly 300 reproduction swords. But that’s just a drop in the bucket when it comes to the arms and militaria collection of Colonial Williamsburg.

Palace SwordsErik Goldstein, Curator of Mechanical Arts and Numismatics (coins, paper currency, and...

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David Hare on playwriting

Interview with David Hare about his career as a playwright. He offers advice to young writers and an insight into his technique, the source of inspiration and what drives him to continue writing.

Interview with David Hare about his career as a playwright. He offers advice to young writers and an insight into his technique, the source of inspiration and what drives him to continue writing.

 “The first person you have to get ‘right’ in a play is yourself…Yourself…meaning, from what point of view am I writing this play? Who is the person writing this play? Of what do they approve or disapprove? Or, do they not what to show their approval or disapproval at all?...

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The Exorcist: The Reincarnation of a Particular Kind of Irrationality

Since the death of William Peter Blatty-the author best known for his novel turned blockbuster film The Exorcist- exorcism is, once again, showing a robust presence in contemporary life, this time among millennials. In this article, Kathy Schultheis warns that this resurgence of interest in exorcism is a sign of how far reason has fallen.

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Tonight. Tonight in Camaguey in 1870
My great-grandfather joined the Rebels
who fight slavery after seeing a woman’s baby
pea shucked out onto the square
her “master” in name only hadn’t given 
his property permission to have it.
 
Ce Soir my uncle waits on the banks
of El Ebro, in Spain, for another fascist attack.
His Mosin broken in the last fight tossed aside
only the bayonet in his left hand, at the ready.
 
Ésta noche my father dragged out of bed
by a death squad out to the porch 
Where my mother, pregnant, pees herself
waiting for the shot which never came:
one of the men had been my father’s student.
 
Tonight Schwerner, Goodman and Chaney
drive down a dusty road into the pitch...
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 Neo-Impressionist Georges Seurat was an influential visionary whose pointillist work launched a movement before his untimely death in Paris in 1891 at the age of 31. He spent two years painting his masterpiece, “A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte,” in which tiny dots of juxtaposed color viewed at the right distance transform into a host of Parisians relaxing on an island in the middle of the Seine.
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